Gold price: why it could go below $1,000 – or above $1,100

The gold price continues to defy gravity.

Received wisdom has it that gold falls in price when interest rates rise – and this cycle was set in motion by the Federal Reserve’s raising of interest rates last week. Higher rates boost income-generating alternatives and tend to spur the dollar, against which gold is a hedge.

But gold has not followed the script. It did slump the day after the Fed’s decision last Thursday, hitting a new six-year low of around $1,050, but it has since been gradually rising and was this morning trading at around $1,080 an ounce. The question now is where it goes from here.

Most investment banks predict that gold will fall below $1,000 an ounce, probably in the early months of next year. A second interest rate rise would bring home the reality of monetary policy tightening, while the dollar would surge from its already historically high levels. Inflation, another key gold hedge, is likely to stay depressed as oil prices tumble.

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Here is when the world’s resources will run out

We have all heard statements made by various experts – many self proclaimed – about when the world’s resources will run out. “Peak Oil” an event based on M. King Hubbert’s theory, is the point in time when the maximum rate of petroleum extraction is reached, after which the rate of production is expected to enter terminal decline. The same theory has been applied to many other commodities, and resources. This infographic, by Visual Capitalist, shows you just how much is left.

Key point with finite resources. Either prices have to go up, or major new discoveries have to be made. The latter requires investment in exploration. Unfortunately, there has been a drying up of capital for exploration over the last three years.

INFOGRAPHIC: Here is when the world's resources will run out

 

Arctic route for Alberta oil could trump stalled B.C. pipeline projects

Alberta’s objective to get land locked oil to overseas markets via the arctic may come together sooner then stalled plans for the Northern Gateway and Keystone XL projects through British Columbia

The basic plan would have a brand new pipeline built from Fort McMurray, Alberta to the northern arctic port of Tuktoyaktak. At nearly 2,400 kilometers the arctic pipeline option would be more than twice the length as the proposed Northern Gateway pipeline to the west coast of British Columbia.

Read more: Financial Post – Arctic route for Alberta oil could trump stalled B.C. pipeline projects